Nature Today

Home

Common cuckoos can distinguish the calls of their neighbors from a stranger's

The City University of New York
Male cuckoos appear to have a unique call that makes them distinguishable to and from other males. A new study appearing in Animal Behaviour shows that an individual cuckoo call may determine how a male responds to an interloper in his territory, behaving more tolerantly towards neighbors and more aggressively towards strangers.
17.03.2017

Common cuckoos can distinguish the calls of their neighbors from a stranger's

The City University of New York
Male cuckoos appear to have a unique call that makes them distinguishable to and from other males. A new study appearing in Animal Behaviour shows that an individual cuckoo call may determine how a male responds to an interloper in his territory, behaving more tolerantly towards neighbors and more aggressively towards strangers.
17.03.2017

Volunteers will count endangered species in Sint Eustatius

Stichting ANEMOON
The underwater nature of the Dutch Caribbean island of Sint Eustatius is particularly rich . Since 1996, the nature around Sint Eustatius is protected in a Marine Park, managed by STENAPA. However, marine live is under pressure by human activities. The ANEMOON Foundation is starting a project to make an inventory of the underwater nature with citizen scientists.
26.02.2017

Sophisticated optical secrets revealed in glossy buttercup flowers

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Buttercup flowers are known for their intense, shiny yellow colour. For over a century, biologists have sought to understand why the buttercup stands out. University of Groningen scientists have now brought together all that was known about the buttercup.
25.02.2017

Download de app

Android app on Google Play Download on the Apple Store

Why nature restoration takes time: fungi grow 'relationships'

NIOO-KNAW
‘Relationships’ in the soil become stronger during the process of nature restoration. Although all major groups of soil life are already present in former agricultural soils, they are not really ‘connected’ at first. These connections need time to (literally) grow, and fungi are the star performers here.
24.02.2017

Why nature restoration takes time: fungi grow 'relationships'

NIOO-KNAW
‘Relationships’ in the soil become stronger during the process of nature restoration. Although all major groups of soil life are already present in former agricultural soils, they are not really ‘connected’ at first. These connections need time to (literally) grow, and fungi are the star performers here.
24.02.2017

Strong singers attract females and keep males at a distance

Wageningen University
Birdsong is commonly assumed to have a dual function: attracting mates and repelling rivals; yet, these contrasting responses often remain untested in the field. Using a novel tracking system, researchers of Wageningen University & Research now show that both male and female great tits indeed change their behaviour when they hear their male neighbour sing.
03.02.2017

Advertisement

Sniffing out your dinner in the dark: how miniature predators get their favourite soil bacteria

NIOO-KNAW
Tiny predators in the soil can literally sniff out their prey: soil bacteria, which communicate with each other using scent. A team of researchers from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) has discovered that these predators, called protists, 'eavesdrop' on the bacteria's communication. It's a discovery that opens up perspectives for agriculture.
09.12.2016

Less plastics in stomachs of fulmars

Wageningen Marine Research
Plastic marine litter, both industrial granules and consumer wastes decline slowly but with certainty. For some years, this tendency was already present. Now, the addition of the data of monitoring year 2015 to the time series of plastic ingestion by Northern Fulmars has shown a statistically significant trend.
01.12.2016

Loss of soil carbon due to climate change will be "huge"

NIOO-KNAW
55 trillion kilograms: that's how much carbon could be released into the atmosphere from the soil by mid-century if climate change isn't stopped. And all in the form of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and methane. Tom Crowther (NIOO-KNAW) and his team are publishing the results of a worldwide study into the effects of climate change on the soil in the issue of Nature that comes out on 1 December.
30.11.2016

Funders